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Kendell Miller-Roberts

Graduate Student, MDes Program

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Photograph of Kendell Miller-Roberts

Biography

Curriculum Vitae
  • B.A. Human Rights, Southern Methodist University
  • B.F.A. Dance Performance, Southern Methodist University

(she/her/hers) - Kendell is a designer, artist, and human rights advocate. Her background in human rights and dance has forged a transformative viewpoint on the relationship between human dignity, design, and community engagement. Kendell’s training in dance (ballet, modern, and jazz) and choreography has given her direct experience in addressing critical social, cultural, and political issues through creative mediums. Her choreographic work Thoughts and Prayers, which explores the topic of American gun violence, was showcased at the 2018 Dallas Dance Festival. In addition to dance, she has strengthened skills of strategic program design and community outreach through her work as a two-year Post-Baccalaureate Fellow for the SMU Human Rights Program.

Within the United States, Kendell has journeyed across the Midwest to study Indigenous rights, and through the Deep South to understand the Civil Rights Movement and capital punishment. She has studied abroad in the Netherlands and Morocco to examine gender and sexuality, and in Poland, Latvia, and Lithuania to learn about the lasting legacy of the Holocaust and WWII. She is a Senior Fellow with Humanity in Action and completed the Copenhagen Fellowship (2018), where she spent a month learning about the rights of minoritized communities within the Danish context. In the summer of 2019, she partnered with J.P. Morgan & Chase Co.’s The Fellowship Initiative and The Experiment in International Living to co-lead a group of Black and Brown male high school students on an immersive, cross-cultural experience in Costa Rica to learn about climate change and sustainability.

While in the MDes Program, she plans on centering a human rights framework into her projects and allowing intergenerational equity and access issues—such as housing inequity—inform her design work to be inclusive and communally just.