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Opening Reception: UKRAINIAN SISTERS

An exhibition of drawings by Ukrainian artists Lesia Kulchynska and Kateryna Lysovenko

UKRANIAN SISTERS poster
When

Tuesday, April 12, 2022
5:00 – 6:30 pm

Where

In-person Event

Art & Architecture Building
2000 Bonisteel Blvd, Ann Arbor MI 48109-2069
Map/Directions

Details

Exhibition
Open to the public
Free of charge

On Tuesday, April 12 at 5pm, join Stamps MFA student Oksana Briukhovetska for the opening of UKRAINIAN SISTERS, an exhibition of drawings by Ukrainian artists Lesia Kulchynska and Kateryna Lysovenko that reflect their experience of war. The exhibition is on view in the Art & Architecture building (west wall of first floor) through April 30.

The series of drawings by Lesia Kulchynska (“War Diary”) and Kateryna Lysovenko (“Dictator’s Food”) was made during the first month of Russian military invasion in Ukraine. These drawings reflect their experience of war.

At the reception, you will hear more about artists, who are now refugees in Europe with their children. You can provide feedback that will be send back to artists, and to discuss the questions: How can art express horrors of the war? Can we understand them without having such experience? Can finally art be helpful to enhance sympathy?

Lesia Kulchynska
, PhD, born in 1984, is a Kyiv-based art curator and visual studies researcher affiliated with the Research Platform of the Pinchuk Art Center. She teached cultural studies at the Kyiv Academy of Media Arts, worked as a curator at the Visual Culture Research Center and Set Independent Art Space (Kyiv). In 2018 – 19 was a Fulbright Scholar residing at New York University. Her research interests are the theory and history of the image and the theory of cinema.

Kateryna Lysovenko
, Artist, born in 1989, graduated from Odesa Hrekov Arts College, National Academy of Fine Arts and Architecture (Kyiv) and Kyiv Academy of Media Arts. In her artworks, she addresses the topic of violence which is oftentimes caused by political, religious and ideological oppression. Worked and lived in Kyiv.