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Student Work Featured in AAFF ‘Out There’ Competition

March 21, 2017

Stamps students Layla Abdul-Jabbar, Elle Leung, Jen Huang, Heidi Liu, Vicki Liu, and Sarah McNamara are featured in the Ann Arbor Film Festival’s “Out There” three-minute animation competition. The competition, a partnership with the Women’s Caucus for Art, Michigan, and the Ann Arbor Film Festival, asked animators to show what’s off the grid, in outer space or inner depths, and what is normally invisible, unspoken, or off limits. Competition winners include:

  • Heidi Liu, “Clean Hands”, 1:59
  • Heidi and Vicki Liu, “Urchin”, 1.09
  • Heidi Liu, “No Sass”, .58
  • Layla Abdul-Jabbar, “Don’t Hide from Me”, 1.08
  • Sarah McNamara, “Oceans Missed”, 1.28
  • Elle Leung & Jen Huang, “Terr”, 2.58
  • Vicki Liu, “Traces”, 1.30
  • Collin Leix, “Interface”, 2.06

A loop of “Out There” winners will be shown as a part of the Ann Arbor Film Festival’s Off The Screen! programming at North Quad Space 2435 throughout the duration of the festival during these hours:  Tuesday, March 21 from 2 - 6 pm; Wednesday, March 22 - Friday, March 24 from 10 am - 6 pm; Saturday, March 25 from 10 am - 4 pm; and Sunday, March 26 from 10 am - 4pm.

There will be a reception for all exhibitions at North Quad on Tuesday, March 21st, from 3-5pm. Refreshments will be served.

Learn more and view the animations at the MIWCA blog and the WCAMichigan Facebook page.

Charles Fairbanks: ‘The Modern Jungle’ at AAFF

March 20, 2017

The Modern Jungle, a feature-length documentary by Charles Fairbanks (MFA 2010), will screen in competition at the 55th Ann Arbor Film Festival on Friday, March 24. A story of globalization filtered through the fever dream of a Mexican shaman, THE MODERN JUNGLE is also an intimate portrait of Zoque culture, commodity fetish, and the predicament of documentary.

The film has shown in Switzerland, Mexico, Poland and Iran; it won a jury award at the Slamdance Film Festival, and will soon show at Ambulante in Mexico City, the Atlanta Film Festival, and at the Film Society of Lincoln Center (NYC) as part of Art of the Real.

Ann Arbor Film Festival screening: Friday March 24, 5pm - Michigan Theater screening room

For more information, visit:

The Modern Jungle | A Film by Charles Fairbanks and Saul Kak and The Modern Jungle / La Selva Negra | Facebook.

Charles Fairbanks: ‘The Modern Jungle’ at AAFF

Sherri Smith: Beyond the Skies at Art & Environment Gallery

March 20, 2017

Stamps Professor Sherri Smith’s work is featured in Beyond the Skies, a new exhibition on display at the Art & Environment Gallery from March 21 - May 30.

Sherri’s current work is based on images from astronomy, both old and very new. She sees her work as somewhat parallel to that of 19th century American artists who went west and painted the new frontier. Space is our new frontier. She finds it interesting to use one of the oldest technologies to show the latest in knowledge. With NASA missions sending back new and even more exciting visual material, Sherri feels that she’s unlikely to run out of inspiration for this series.

Sherri Smith: Beyond the Skies
Exhibition Dates: March 21 – May 30, 2017
Reception: March 28, 5-6p.m.
Gallery hours:  Monday - Friday, 8 am - 6 pm. Closed Sat. & Sun. 
Dana Building 1st Floor, Ford Commons, University of Michigan Central Campus

Sherri Smith: Beyond the Skies at Art & Environment Gallery

Sherri Smith “Star Cluster in X-Ray” 3’W x 3’H, Woven Fiber

Shreyas Karle: Visiting Artist

March 20, 2017

Visiting artist, organizer, curator, and CONA co-founder Shreyas Karle gave a presentation at Stamps on Monday, March 13 entitled SUICIDE (structuring utopian institutional centres in a dysfunctional economy/ecosystems).

Karle’s visit was supported by the Presidential India Initiatives grant and Witt Visiting Artist fund. 

Working across disciplines, Shreyas Karle uses formats such as illustration, collage, video, publications, sculptural forms and collaborative community projects to visually harness absurdity and social puns that shine light upon more serious psychological issues and situations. In his own words, Karle concerns himself with the grammar of art, and his process-based practice comes together in unique ways that is more concerned with the idea than the final form. Karle purposefully works against ideas of linear creative processes and celebrates the accidental findings of research that link his nomadic moments of inspiration. In addition to his work as a visual artist and directly linked to process of his practice, Karle is also the founder and co-director of CONA, an artist run space in Mumbai, and has also served as the Artistic Director of Sandarbh, another artist run residency in a village in Rajasthan.

Karle has exhibited in the first Kochi Biennale, at the ESSL Museum in Vienna and has been awarded residencies at Gasworks, ProHelvetia, Montalvo Arts Center and various honors such as the FICA Emerging Artist Award, the Bodhi Award, and the NasreenMohamedi Scholarship from the Faculty of Fine Arts, MSU Baroda.

Learn more about Karle’s Cona Projects: http://conaprojects.blogspot.com/2013/03/blog-post.html

Shreyas Karle: Visiting Artist

Shreyas Karle with Robert Platt

Nick Tobier Interviewed on Stateside

March 13, 2017

Stamps Professor Nick Tobier recently discussed his book ‘Looping Detroit: A People Mover Travelogue’ with Cynthia Canty on the Michigan Radio program Stateside.

Think of it as an artistic “fan letter” to Detroit’s People Mover.

Artist Nick Tobier’s new book is Looping Detroit: A People Mover Travelogue. It’s a collection of essays, photographs and poems inspired by the People Mover and the views it offers of Detroit’s geography and culture.

Tobier, who’s a University of Michigan professor originally from New York City, brings an outsider’s perspective to something that sparks some passionate discussion whenever it’s brought up among Detroiters – the People Mover.

The “tiny, tiny train” in a gigantic city: An outsider’s ode to Detroit’s People Mover | Stateside, Michigan Radio

Nick Tobier Interviewed on Stateside

Michele Oka Doner: Pop Art Comes to Michigan, 1963

March 13, 2017

On Saturday, March 18, artist and Stamps alumna Michele Oka Doner (B.S. Des 1966, MFA 1968) will take part in a group discussion about the influence and impact of two Pop Art exhibitions that occurred on campus in 1963.

In 1963, the University of Michigan Museum of Art hosted two pioneering exhibitions of Pop Art. At that time the concept of Pop Art was under construction, and its subjects—consumer culture, food and other appetites, technology and the mass media, the Cold War, women’s roles—were live issues at the university. This program showcases artists whose work was too raw or unusual to become part of the later art-world canon, revising historical understanding of the early 1960s and opening a window into creative life at the university.

Throughout the program, digital reproductions of works from the 1963 exhibitions and related works on paper will be on display in the Commons and in the cases outside Stern Auditorium.

12-2:50 PM: Professor Rebecca Zurier (University of Michigan) will open the event by exploring the origins of the 1963 Pop Art exhibition. The art historian Michael Lobel (Hunter College) will speak on “Defining Pop: Exhibitions, Circulation, and the Makings of an Art Movement,” and David McCarthy (Rhodes College) will look discuss “Peter Saul Against Pop Art.”

3-5 PM: Alumnae Michele Oka Doner (artist) and Miriam Levin (Case Western Reserve University) – whose minds were blown by the art they saw in the 1963 exhibitions – will join moderator Alexander Potts (University of Michigan) for a group discussion.

This Bicentennial LSA Theme Semester event is presented with support from the Bicentennial Office; College of Literature, Science, and the Arts; Eisenberg Institute for Historical Studies; History; History of Art; Institute for the Humanities; Office of Research; Rackham Graduate School; and University of Michigan Museum of Art.

Pop Art Comes to Michigan, 1963
Saturday, March 18, 2017 from 12 - 5 PM
Stern Auditorium, University of Michigan Museum of Art

Michele Oka Doner: Pop Art Comes to Michigan, 1963

William Burgard: Ypsilanti Wayfinding Signs

March 13, 2017

Ypsilanti recently unveiled a series of new wayfinding signs featuring local icons designed by Stamps Lecturer William Burgard.

The project brought together the City of Ypsilanti, the Ypsilanti DDA and the Charter Township of Ypsilanti in a partnership joined by organizations like Eastern Michigan University, Washtenaw County Parks and Recreation, the A2Y Chamber of Commerce and Washtenaw Community College.

Some of the signs point to community assets, businesses, or parking areas and are inscribed with “Ytown” or “Ypsi Real,” with colorful icons like Rosie the Riveter in a patriotic theme and a bright yellow Hudson Commodore.

There are now 18 wayfinding signs and 19 parking signs, featuring local icons designed by William Burgard to represent the community of 20,000 residents. Burgard is a lecturer at the University of Michigan’s Penny W. Stamps School of Art & Design and is a former director of the Ann Arbor Summer Festival.

New wayfinding signs in city, township are ‘very Ypsilanti’ | MLive

William Burgard: Ypsilanti Wayfinding Signs

Image by Hunter Dyke for The Ann Arbor News

Melanie Manos Exhibits at The Max

March 13, 2017

Stamps Lecturer Melanie Manos’s photographic work is featured as part of Art @ the Max - a new collaboration between Essay’d, the Wayne State University Collection, and the Detroit Symphony Orchestra. 

The exhibition runs through June, 2017.  Visitors must have an event ticket to gain entrance to the exhibition.  The Max M. & Marjorie S. Fisher Music Center is located at 3711 Woodward Ave., Detroit, MI 48201

The eight artists on display, including several former Kresge Artist Fellows, are all well-regarded names in Detroit’s expanding art community.

Visitors are likely to be grabbed and amused by Melanie Manos’ “Hanging On,” which perfectly embodies Panton’s search for art with presence.

In this huge color photograph, Manos - who uses herself in most of her work - seems to be hanging by her fingertips from an upside-down stairwell.

“Melanie uses her body as a commentary on social conditions,” Panton explained, “and there’s an element of the cinematic to her work. She’s a great fan of silent movies.”

Detroit Artists Take over the Max | The Detroit News

Melanie Manos Exhibits at The Max

Melis Agabigum Exhibits May the Bridges I Burn, Light the Way at BBAC

March 8, 2017

Work by Melis Agabigum (BFA 2013) is featured in May the Bridges I Burn, Light the Way, a solo exhibition at the Birmingham Bloomfield Art Center (BBAC) from March 10 - April 23 with an opening reception from 6 - 8 pm on March 10.

Provoked by an interest in material fiction, Melis’s work examines loss, repetition & the notion of burden that individuals carry from their relationships. Her soft sculptures explore the unseen tether of the physical & emotional weights that affect individuals in how they perceive their connection to others, their bodies & space.

Melis Agabigum: May the Bridges I Burn, Light the Way
Exhibition Dates: March 10 - April 23, 2017
Opening reception: March 10, 6 - 8 pm
Birmingham Bloomfield Art Center
1516 S. Cranbrook, Birmingham, MI 48009

Melis Agabigum Exhibits May the Bridges I Burn, Light the Way at BBAC

“Stand Here and Hold This For Me, A Second, Will You?” by Melis Agabigum

Amanda Krugliak: State of Exception Featured in NYT

March 8, 2017

State of Exception, an exhibition co-created by artist/curator Amanda Krugliak (BFA 1984) and artist/photographer Richard Barnes in collaboration with UM anthropologist Jason De Leon, was recently reviewed in the New York Times by Holland Cotter.  The exhibition, currently on display at Parsons School of Design in New York, is based on De Leon’s Undocumented Migration Project, a research initiative that studies clandestine and unauthorized desert traffic between Mexico and the United States and collects its material traces.

Strong political art is hard to make. So when it turns up, it’s worth a look. In an era of “great, great walls” and “bad hombres,” an exhibition called “State of Exception/Estado de Excepción” at Parsons School of Design fills the bill. It starts with a kind of special-effects installation, a video of what looks like fast-flowing river projected across the gallery floor and surging toward you. You walk over it to enter the show, and the shuddering current makes you feel woozy, as if you don’t quite know what your feet are doing.

The image turns out not to be of water but of human debris — castoff clothing, backpacks, water bottles — seemingly swept along by some unseen force. From wall labels, you learn the source of the stuff. It all belonged to illegal immigrants entering the United States from Mexico through the Sonoran Desert in Arizona, one of the hottest, driest stretches of land North America. The hazards of trying to cross it are potentially deadly: heat stroke, (summer temperatures are regularly over 100 degrees), dehydration and attacks — robberies, rapes, murders — by bandits and border patrols. From 2001 to 2009, at least 2,500 migrants died, and probably many more whose bodies vanished.

For Migrants Headed North, the Things They Carried to the End

 

Amanda Krugliak: State of Exception Featured in NYT