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Holly Hughes: Not My President’s Day

February 16, 2017

In a new American Theatre interview, Stamps Professor Holly Hughes discusses the movement inspired by her Facebook post: on Monday, February 20, Not My President’s Day creative protests by feminist performance artists will take place at venues around the country.

Ann Arbor area events include:

  • Bad Hombres and Nasty Women/Not My President’s Day at Neutral Zone, 310 East Washington Street, Ann Arbor - featuring Stamps faculty Holly Hughes, Malcolm Tulip, and Leslie Rogers, as well as alumna Erin Markey.  Proceeds benefit Planned Parenthood.
  • Bad and Nasty at Light Box, 8641 Linwood St, Detroit, featuring Stamps faculty Melanie Manos and Emilia Javanica.  Proceeds benefit ACLU.
  • Bad and Nasty Cabaret at 26 North Washington Street, Ypsilanti.  Proceeds benefit Planned Parenthood.

View all locations at badandnasty.com.

“About two weeks after the election, I posted an idle threat, as I am known to do on Facebook, saying I was going to do some sort of cabaret in Ann Arbor, where I live,” Hughes recalls. She called all “Bad Hombres and Nasty Women” to revolt on President’s Day, which she would rebrand as “Not My President’s Day.” Within minutes, people started liking her post and saying they wanted in. “By the next morning, there were so many people that wanted to interpret the idea on their own I was moaning, because I couldn’t add them quickly enough to the Facebook group,” Hughes says.

Fortunately others stepped up to the plate, including another giant of the feminist avant-garde movement, Lois Weaver of Split Britches, as well as social media whiz Mary Jo Watts. The “Bad Hombres and Nasty Women” Facebook group swelled to what is now almost 2,000 members, with more than 50 planned sites in the works.

Not My President events will be happening in both big cities and and smaller communities. At La MaMa in New York City, Karen Finley (also one of the NEA Four) is among the lineup in an event curated and hosted by Nicky Paraiso. Also in New York, Penny Arcade and Tammy Faye Starlite will read David Mamet’s The Anarchist at the WOW Cafe (directed by no less than Austin Pendleton). Meanwhile in Houston, Texas, the punk lesbian feminist band Girls in the Nose will join feminist performance groups Les Nez, MyDolls, and Kegels for Hegel in a rousing evening. Performance artist Raegan Truax represents in San Francisco, and in London the performance collective Pussy Patrons will screen their short film GRAB by PUSSY PATRONS.

Staging a Resistance Holiday: Not My President’s Day | American Theatre

Holly Hughes: Not My President’s Day

Maria Cotera Interviewed on Chicana Fotos Exhibition

February 16, 2017

U-M Professor Maria Cotera is interviewed in advance of the new exhibition Chicana Fotos: Nancy De Los Santos, a collaboration with Stamps faculty and students opening at WSU on Friday, Feb. 17.

For the past seven years, University of Michigan Professor Maria Cotera has been documenting the work of Chicana and Latina artists, writers and organizers who were active in civil rights movements in the 1960s and ’70s in her digital humanities project Chicana por mi Raza Digital Memory Collective.

It was during this work that she met U-M alumna Nancy De Los Santos, an accomplished filmmaker and proud “Chicana from Chicago” who has dedicated her life and career to rewriting and redefining the image of Latina/os in the mainstream media. She co-produced “The Bronze Screen: 100 Years of the Latin Image in Hollywood Cinema” and was an associate producer on the feature film “Selena.”

Photos taken by De Los Santos are now part of “Chicana Fotos,” an exhibition curated by Cotera that shows De Los Santos as a woman armed with a camera, capturing historic events in the struggles for social justice of the 1970s.

‘Chicana Fotos’ exhibition highlights civil rights struggles |  Arts & Culture

Maria Cotera Interviewed on Chicana Fotos Exhibition

Nancy De Los Santos self-portrait, circa 1975.

Matthew Zivich Exhibits at What Pipeline Gallery

February 15, 2017

Matthew Zivich Exhibits at What Pipeline gallery, Detroit

Work by Saginaw Valley State University Professor of Art Matthew Zivich (B.S. Des, 1960) is on display at the What Pipeline Gallery in Detroit through March 25.  The exhibition, Empires and Enclaves, includes four of his “architectural models”  from the 1980s and four “seascape” paintings made of household caulk completed from 2005 to 2009. 

“The five architectural models date from approximately 1987 to 1989 and appear to be typical examples of preliminary, scale-model buildings. Included are representations of iconic modern structures such as Mies van der Rohe’s 860 Lake Shore Drive and Phillip Johnson’s Glass House; and an anonymous government building from Munich during the Third Reich. Fictitious structures include a cenotaph for Mussolini made for an imaginary competition sponsored by the city of Milan, Italy, celebrating the 50th anniversary of Il Duce’s death; and finally, Enclaves is an urban depiction initially inspired by the bombardment of Sarajevo during the breakup of Yugoslavia.

The caulk paintings in the “Leviathan” series represent warships that were instrumental as precursors to revolution or invasion, created using a non-traditional medium such as household caulk. Included in this series are Untitled (Potemkin), Untitled (Aurora), Untitled (Maine), and Untitled (Mystery Sub).”

Matthew Zivich: Empires & Enclaves
Exhibition Dates: February 10 - March 25, 2017
What Pipeline Gallery
What Pipeline
3525 W. Vernor Hwy
Detroit, MI 48216

Matthew Zivich Exhibits at What Pipeline Gallery

Georgette Zirbes: Retrospective Exhibition

February 15, 2017

A retrospective exhibition featuring the works of Stamps Arthur F. Thurnau Professor Emerita Georgette Zirbes will be on display at DePauw University from March 10 - April 9, 2017.

Conversations: A Retrospective Exhibition
Richard E. Peeler Art Center, Visual Arts Gallery,
DePauw University, Greencastle, Indiana

Georgette Zirbes: Retrospective Exhibition

Stephanie Brown and Jessica Fogel Design New Photography Exhibit

February 15, 2017

First year MFA candidate Stephanie Brown recently worked with Professor and Chair of Dance, Jessica Fogel, to design an extensive photo exhibit celebrating the long history of dance at U-M. The photo exhibit is part of an installation in the lobby of the Power Center that also includes live dance performances by 10 Dance majors.  The dancers bring to life the rich history of dance at U-M.  The lobby installation/performance took place from February 2 - 5, and the photo exhibit will remain on display in the Power Center lobby through February 19.

The lobby performance and exhibit was followed by a main-stage performance featuring a wide range of Dance faculty works.  Highlighting the evening are two guest artist works: one by Meredith Monk and the other by NYC dance artists Xan Burley and Alex Springer. To learn more about the performance, visit Glancing Back, Dancing Forward.

 

Stephanie Brown and Jessica Fogel Design New Photography Exhibit

David Chung Featured in DC-Area Exhibition

February 13, 2017

Work by Stamps Professor David Chung is featured in The Hand Print Workshop: Twenty Years of Partnership in Print, a new exhibition on display at Athenaeum in Alexandria, VA February 23 - April 2, 2017.

Dennis O’Neil’s Hand Print Workshop has fostered the work of printmakers across America and internationally, many of them leading artists from the former Soviet Union.

This exhibit features a wide representation of the prints created by these artists in his Alexandria studiox, including some by William Christenberry, David Chung and Renee Stout — as well as works by O’Neil himself. The gallery talk on March 4 will feature O’Neil, Steven Cushner, Alexander Djikia, Vera Khlebnikova, and Renee Stout and will be moderated by Sarah Tanguy, Art Historian, independent curator and critic based in Washington, DC.

The Hand Print Workshop: Twenty Years of Partnership in Print
Exhibition Dates: February 23 - April 2, 2017
Opening Reception: February 26 from 4 to 6 pm
Exhibit generously sponsored by Heather Corey and TTR Sotheby’s International Realty

Athenaeum, 201 Prince St, Alexandria, VA 22314

David Chung Featured in DC-Area Exhibition

“Nightriders”, 2013, silkscreen by David Chung

Suzanne McClelland: Survey Exhibition at The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum

February 13, 2017

Work by Suzanne McClelland (BFA 1981) is featured at The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum from March 5 - September 4, 2017.

Suzanne McClelland: Just Left Feel Right, is McClelland’s first museum survey. Spanning twenty-five years, Just Left Feel Right focuses on works from specific periods of her career that share a distinctive commonality, capturing the eruptive and disparate voices of a shifting American vernacular and its rippling effect on the way we communicate in our hyperkinetic time.

McClelland is most widely known for her deft use of linguistics and her sensually textured surfaces. She mines the ways in which communities speak, collecting language and choosing words that trend, are debated, heard on street corners, and absorbed from streaming news feeds; words that are rich in meaning, that reach and multiply, that drop in and out of everyday life. The words she selects hover between materials; letters press up against each other, run off the surface, join together, dissolve, loop, and collide into and onto themselves. Employing a wide range of materials, her compositions have a rhythm and beat as they perform, throb, and swagger, capturing the cadences of our speech, mimicking the physicality of how people express themselves. Pauses, utterances, and hysteria, the inflection of tone and the modulation of our tempo, bodily expressions and gesticulations, all are translated into painterly rhythmic compositions modeled after oratory repartee.

McClelland seizes these audible sensations, stealing words right out of the mouth, but also embodying our micro-expressions. In 2012, she began to incorporate numbers into her work as a reaction to the data onslaught of the Internet age. A mind-numbing rush of streaming lists for everything and anything are published on the Web. McClelland, a collector of messaging, in particular emotive and directional information, began researching the data that represents the individual and vice versa. This endless data stream is how twenty-first century society forecasts outcomes: from steady news spills that flood the imaginations, to engineering distorted images about identity and body type, and (in)forming biased estimates and postures. With the rise of social media as a primary source of content, opinion is now often misread as “news.”

Suzanne McClelland: Just Left Feel Right
Exhibition Dates: March 5 - September 4, 2017
Opening Reception: 2 - 5 pm Sunday, March 5, 2017

The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum
258 Main St, Ridgefield, CT 06877

Suzanne McClelland: Survey Exhibition at The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum

Image: Suzanne McClelland, “Since Oklahoma After Johns Before Tomorrow (SPLC)”, 2015.

Stephanie Tharp Receives 2017 VentureWell Faculty Grant

February 13, 2017

Stamps Associate Professor Stephanie Tharp has received a $30,000 2017 VentureWell Faculty Grant for Hacking Health, a new project that combines a design charrette and a studio course for cross-disciplinary student teams to design solutions to change the delivery and experience of healthcare.  Hacking Health will address challenges in health monitoring, hoping to lower barriers to effective self-management of personal care.

VentureWell’s Faculty Grants program offers university faculty up to $30k in funding to pioneer new ways to challenge students to develop inventive, STEM-based ideas and gain the entrepreneurial skills they need to bring them to market.

VentureWell is a non-profit organization that supports the creation of new ventures from an emerging generation of science and technology inventors and supports the innovation and entrepreneurship ecosystems that are critical to their success. We’ve funded or trained over 4,500 science and technology inventors and innovators and nurtured nearly a thousand of their startups. Their startups have raised subsequent funds totaling over $800 million and are reaching millions of people in over 50 countries. Visit venturewell.org to learn more.

Stephanie Tharp Receives 2017 VentureWell Faculty Grant

Rebekah Modrak Interviewed

February 13, 2017

Stamps Assistant Professor Rebekah Modrak’s latest project, co-curated with Marialaura Ghidini of the Srishti Institute of Art, Design and Technology, is a “live exhibition” titled #exstrange that invites a global group of artists and designers to create works to be encountered, auction-style, by the passersby of eBay.  Modrak was recently interviewed about the project, the latest in a series of work that focuses on shared concerns between art and commerce.

Q: What was your inspiration for #exstrange?

Modrak: The term #exstrange comes from our working title “Exchange with Stranger,” influenced by philosopher and sociologist Georg Simmel’s understanding of the “stranger,” which he described as a “mobile figure who circulates goods.” In our exhibition, artists circulate ideas through the pretense of selling goods or services. We, the curators, see eBay as an opportunity to enable artists/designers to reach out to members of online communities clustered around object experiences. For example, the community who collects decorative plates may encounter Sophia Brueckner’s commemorative plate of dreamy landscapes stitched together from 100+ romance novels using a digital algorithm to make decisions about nostalgia and longing.

Q: Why eBay?

Modrak: #exstrange welcomes serendipitous encounters with exchange-partners from other geographic, cultural and political regions, either viewers who seek out the show, potential buyers and happen-chance browsers—all may inquire into ideas proposed through the auctions/artworks by commenting directly on the listing, by bidding, or by creating and posting their own artwork/auctions.

Q: What do you hope to accomplish or illustrate?

Modrak: We are interested in opening up discussions that might challenge the uses we make of technology in our everyday activities, and all of the assumptions we make about it. eBay represents a business model of the dot.com era, and through the years has tried to propagate a kind of person-to-person trade. What we have now is a culture of commodity that is primarily circulated online through platforms that are not just dedicated to e-commerce but also to interpersonal communication. This shift is interesting to us and we are trying to bring it together by also using social media which, in the ‘90s, did not exist. The personal relationship that can be established between a seller and buyer is what we are interested in, especially in a time in which our personal communication is so much mediated by interfaces created by companies for business purposes—we still very rarely think about this proactively.

U-M professor’s project encourages artists, curators to intervene in capitalism using eBay

 

Rebekah Modrak Interviewed

Stamps in Color Visits Kehinde Wiley Exhibition

February 13, 2017

On February 9, 2017, 50 students and 4 faculty members traveled to the Toledo Museum of Art for a Master Series Lecture by Kehinde Wiley. After the lecture, students were invited to participate in a private networking reception and then preview Kehinde’s latest exhibit, “A New Republic,” before it opens to the public on Friday February 10th.

The exhibit will be up at the Toledo Museum of Art from February 10th - May 14th, 2017.

View images of the visit here.

Stamps in Color Visits Kehinde Wiley Exhibition